conversation is an engine

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Posts Tagged ‘Ignite

This is how to do an Ignite talk: Commutapult

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I did an Ignite talk once.

Not so good. Maybe I’ll try it again. Maybe I won’t. But Mark Selander did it right:

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Via Scott Berkun

Written by kirkistan

August 8, 2012 at 2:39 pm

Posted in curiosities

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The Trap of Telling All You Know

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The Benefits of Version 1.0

My Ignite experience reminds me that the goal of speaking is engagement, even above conveying information. Looking back, I tried too hard to say too much.

I have a much deeper appreciation for people who can pull off a compelling talk. And I realize these people work hard to be compelling. Preparation is much more about editing then writing. Then again, conveying excitement to an audience–could it be something of a gift? Maybe a gift that grows through practice.

But as Greg Flanagan said in his wonderful talk “Make Mistakes,” I’ll call this version 1.0.

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Image Credit: via 2headedsnake

Written by kirkistan

May 25, 2012 at 8:08 am

Posted in curiosities, making mistakes

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Livestream Ignite Minneapolis Tonight Starting at 7pm

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I have an idea but just barely the guts to step on stage.

I’m doing it anyway. Watch Ignite Minneapolis here starting at 7pm today (24 May 21012).

I just hope the Mighty Wurlitzer doesn’t rise from the depths before I get to Side 20.

Written by kirkistan

May 24, 2012 at 7:52 am

Philosophers don’t pack heat. Right?

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On Preparing for Ignite Minneapolis

outcome not yet determined

The unrelenting movement—every 15 seconds a slide changes—makes speaking at Ignite Minneapolis more a verbal dance than a straight-out talk. I’ve compressed four voluminous thinkers (Martin Buber, Emmanuel Levinas, JL Austin and Wayne Booth) into pairs of 10 second sound bites. If the audience includes philosophers packing heat, I may not make it out alive. Practice, practice, practice. And more practice. And then practice lots, lots more. It’s the only thing that begins to still the nerves.

I remind myself of the dream: to see if anyone will bite on my notion that ordinary conversations can be turned into insight-producing engines. All it takes is four steps to tune our thinking—but I’ll wait until after I present to spill the beans on “How to HACK a Conversation for Insight.” It’s the message I’m excited about presenting. Very, very swiftly.

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Image Credit: Zohar Lazar via 2headedsnake

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