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Archive for the ‘Hard Conversations’ Category

Persuade Me

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But Not With Your Dumpster Words

Academic journals are near the top of our list for credible sources of information. The work of Retraction Watch (along with Professor Carl Elliot’s snarky Fear and Loathing in Bioethics) has helped me understand that peer-review processes are fallible and can be gamed. Still, the intent of providing transparent work that smart people can discuss seems a solid route to truly reliable knowledge.

Promotional copy is on the other end of the continuum. As a copywriter, I try to use reason and logic to engage readers. And I’ll bring in emotion to tell my client’s story. But I want a discussion, not a manipulative parlor trick. Good copy addresses humans with reason, logic, and emotion that honors our humanness without resorting to manipulation. After all, that’s how humans talk with other humans.

A Continuum of Believability

Further down the continuum of believability is sales talk. It’s the kind of stuff we hear from the used car salesman and telemarketers or our 45th president: “best,” “tremendous,” “today only,” “you’ve never seen anything like this.” These are dumpster words that signify active lying or passive disinformation. You can tell by the lack of specificity. The words are in-credible, that is, not believable and we should turn away from them.

Somewhere in the middle of the continuum of believability are persuasive commentaries and editorials that are biased and meant to convince. Their authors acknowledge their bias straight on and early in their communication. We see their bias and take that into account as we read. Even nearer the middle of the credibility continuum is instructional words that aim to help the reader accomplish something. That’s what my current class is about—helping readers take some action out in the world.

If we are aiming toward credibility in our communication (a typical goal for sane people), we’ll pull from the tools and building-block thoughts that are well-vetted with facts and citations from other credible sources. We’ll also grab from the piles of words that invite further reflection and discussion. The more credible we want to be, the more we’ll direct our typing hands away from the sales talk words, those dead-end, short-circuiting, dumpster words that deceive and misdirect as they are spoken or written.

Smart People Discuss for Credibility

It’s how we sort most everything in life. By talking together about a book or a movie or a social problem or a new idea, we can often get to credible and truthful statements. Statements that we can believe and act on. But to get to that place of belief, we need to think critically about the pop-up slogans and pre-conceived notions that our ideology or brand-preference have placed in our brainpans. If we resist those clichés and talking points and instead look for words from our own experience, no matter how messy or awkward, we have a chance of getting to the truth.

Credible information withstands questions and discussion by smart people. Credibility is a way forward.

I am eager for our culture to develop a taste for credibility.

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Image credits: Kirk Livingston

I’m Planning a Jailbreak

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My social media marketing class is writing about what it’s like to reach across our borders and boundaries, at guided-by-voices.com.

Please Say More.

Don’t look for the file in the cake

I’ve been watching the guards’ patterns and taking measurements and laying plans. I’ve made contact with the getaway vehicle and the man driving it.

untitled503976052902.jpg Don’t be your own jailer.

I’m just not sure who’s in jail: me or my friend.

In our Social Media Marketing class, we talked about a Jesus story where he asked a question that crossed at least three boundaries: racial, religious, and gender. Crossing those three boundaries surprised nearly everyone in the story because none of those boundaries was proper to cross.

  • In asking that question. Jesus’s crew saw a despised person in a very different light.
  • With that question, the despised person saw she wasn’t despised and in fact was welcomed as an insider.
  • With that question, a village dropped their spite and stepped forward alongside the outcast

All because of a short Q & A that…

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How could a Christian possibly support Donald Trump?

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Short Answer: Hatred for Hillary Clinton

I hope and pray evangelicals don’t support Trump because of his racist, xenophobic, misogynist, lying, bullying, know-nothing, clearly anti-Jesus approach. I’ve heard many cite hatred for Hillary Clinton as a reason for support for Trump—and perhaps misogyny may be something evangelicals can live with.

Set aside Clinton’s pro-choice views and problems with truth-telling for a moment. Isn’t there something about Hillary Clinton taking leadership as a woman that galls evangelicals? Her leadership doesn’t fit the narrow evangelical reading of a woman’s role as servant and (even better) subservient.

But then the Proverbs 31 woman was an outlier, right?

Check out Sara Pulliam Bailey’s article on evangelical views on Hillary Clinton:

wapo-20161009

Written by kirkistan

October 9, 2016 at 7:37 am

when words fail

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via Conversation Agent

Perfect: This is Impossible.

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Let’s Keep Talking

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Written by kirkistan

July 11, 2016 at 9:51 am

The Secret Voice of Pleasure

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Image Credit: Kirk Livingston

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