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Extreme Listening: 4 Motivations

with 5 comments

If one motivation doesn’t fit you right now, check that you have a pulse

We’re not great listeners. There’s so much we want to say and we are generally desperate to be heard. And in these highly partisan times, we simply shout at and past each other and call it a conversation.

Don't let listening go unused.

Don’t let listening go unused.

But there are natural times when each of us actually does stop to listen. I count at least four:

  1. I Need Something. The most interested college students I teach are the ones who realize they need something. They are motivated to listen and stay engaged in class because they see themselves using the skill/knowledge we are talking about. I listen intently to the old guy at the hardware store because I truly have no clue why this plumbing connection will not seal. I listen because I need whatever it is the person is saying.
  2. I Want to Understand. It’s why a lot of us read fiction and non-fiction alike: we want to understand this topic and we’re willing to pay attention to this author as she or he spins out the story or argument. Wanting to understand is the motivation behind a story’s tension—it’s the hook that keeps us on the pages. We listen to our kids when they explain why they did this or that (when it seems perfectly counterintuitive to me). We sometimes listen to our own explanations and obfuscations as we try to distance ourselves from some thing we’ve done.
  3. I Want to be Close to You. “Listen, sweetheart, tell me everything about you.” The early days of romance give way over time to the growing realization that there is much we don’t know about our spouse—even after 30 years of marriage. We listen because we want to hear the perspective of our beloved.
  4. I Want to Serve. “Serve” sounds so menial, doesn’t it? And yet finding yourself in a position to help another is a primary motivation for work—at least I’ve found it so. Wanting to help beats working only for money. Wanting to help beats working to amass power every time. And wanting to serve is a sort of gift that keeps on giving. The desire to serve means listening to someone to see what he or she needs and wants. You cannot serve without listening.

If you have a listener in your life—someone who lets you spin out your argument or story and remains engaged—count yourself fortunate. I believe there’s actually quite a lot of healing in those listening encounters.

If you want to be an extreme listener tap into one of these motivations and apply it to your current situation.

Can you think of other motivations for listening?

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Image credit: Kirk Livingston

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Written by kirkistan

May 7, 2015 at 9:38 am

5 Responses

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  1. I can’t, but I appreciate your post. You make great points. I bet you’re one of those good listeners, making Mrs. Kirkistan a lucky lady! 😀

    createarteveryday

    May 7, 2015 at 2:38 pm

    • Thanks. We do try to honor each other by listening, but, alas, I fail all the time at it. She is way more patient than me.

      kirkistan

      May 7, 2015 at 2:46 pm

      • Hey, knowing you fail is half the battle lol.

        createarteveryday

        May 7, 2015 at 2:47 pm

      • I suppose the other half is trying again. Thanks for your comments.

        kirkistan

        May 7, 2015 at 2:48 pm

      • I think we’re all too distracted in today’s world by phones, computer screens, etc. It’s more of a challenge than it used to be. You’re welcome.

        createarteveryday

        May 7, 2015 at 2:52 pm


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